Guest Speaker Chuck Perrodin

Louisiana's Vanishing Coast Photograph from Chuck Perrodin's presentation.

Louisiana’s Vanishing Coast
Photograph from Chuck Perrodin’s presentation.

by Kaci Jones

During my Coastal Environmental Communication class, we has a guest speaker, from CPRA, Chuck Perrodin who talked about the Master Plan and why it was put into place.

The Master Plan was put into effect because in the last 80 years Louisiana has lost approximately 1,900 square miles of land along the coast. If we were to measure the land loss by taking away certain parishes then the following parishes would be no existent: St. Charles, St. John the Baptist, St. James, Ascension, East Baton Rouge, East Feliciana.

This is how much land has been lost, in parishes, along our coast since the Corps of Engineers completed the levee system in the 1930s. Photograph from Chuck Perrodin's presentation.

This is how much land has been lost, in parishes, along our coast since the Corps of Engineers completed the levee system in the 1930s.
Photograph from Chuck Perrodin’s presentation.

If we were to not implemented the Master Plan 1,750 more square miles would have been lost every century. Looking at this in perspective, this is like losing the land mass of NYC every 13 years.

Perrodin explains that the land that we now call Louisiana was originally created by built up sediment that was put off by the Mississippi River. When Americans leveed off the river in the 1930s they thought they were doing good because they were protecting the people, but they later found out that they might have been protecting the people but the land is what really needed protecting.

While most people look over the coast land in Louisiana like it doesn’t need to exist they need to realize that without it sources of energy, seafood/wildlife, and ports-cargo will also not exist either. Louisiana’s total combined truck flow is greater than any other port site in the United States this alone is vital to the everyday life of Americans.

The main question people have when hearing about Louisiana’s massive land lose is ‘Can it be saved?’ As childish as it sounds, people aren’t going to agree to help us out unless they are reassured that it can be saved and that it is vital.

The 2012 Master Plan shows that in 30 years, Louisiana will no longer be losing land and in fact gaining land back. This is a major accomplishment and the Master Plan is the reason why we’re doing such a great job restoring the coast.

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